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Ex RTTL 2770

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Category: Boats (In alphabetical order)
Forum Name: Target Towing Launches
Forum Description: Discussion on Target Towing Launches
URL: http://www.bmpt.co.uk/forum_posts.asp?TID=683
Printed Date: 14 November 2018 at 5:31pm


Topic: Ex RTTL 2770
Posted By: 2770
Subject: Ex RTTL 2770
Date Posted: 11 February 2010 at 4:04pm
Ex RTTL 2770.
 
USDV Canadian Osprey on C.C diving support duties with the US Navy 1989. ( United States flagged out of Norfolk Virginia.)
 
 



Replies:
Posted By: johnk
Date Posted: 11 February 2010 at 5:14pm
Many thanks for this, clearly an ex RTTL launch still from the bridge,
 
Johnk


Posted By: Jim
Date Posted: 11 February 2010 at 9:27pm
Hang on thats taken off Dunoon (Holy Loch on the Clyde)....i would know that hill behind anywhere....
 
I never knew Osprey served in the US navy...cheers new info on the old girl, anyone an idea where she is now, not been to Clydebank of late so dont know if she has moved?


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Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 February 2010 at 10:11am
Correct. That is in the Holy loch.
 
I said she was working with the US Navy not serving in. AS-31 and AS-33 was her designated duty ships under a Baltic Exchange contract.
 
As I have also said, she was US flagged out of Norfolk,VA ( flew the "Stars and Bars") at that time. This also allowed her to be used by the USN for re-enlistment venues, which was done.


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 February 2010 at 12:24pm
I have now been informed that there may be some confusion over the actual ownership of ex- RTTL 2770 during and from her refit for diving support, and then up until her sale. This is probably due to "local knowledge" attempting to fill gaps in information they were not entitled nor in any way privy to.

To avoid any further confusion :- USDV Canadian Osprey (ex RTTL 2770) was in fact owned by CMS (Canada) Ltd of Vancouver, Canada who held all of her 64 disposable maritime shares. However, in European waters she was operated by Osprey Charter services who were a UK subsidiary of CMS (Canada) Ltd.
 
Another part of her history at that time :- She was the only Boat/US offshore rated rescue-towboat operating in European waters. She also held a UK Category 2 commercial ticket.
 
If anyone wishes further accurate history please ask. 


Posted By: rafwebfoot
Date Posted: 01 March 2010 at 7:16pm
just p[icked up on this.  2770 was bought by Capt. Donald MacFarlane 1985/86 and he renamed her CANADIAN OSPREY as he had joint nationality (British and Canadian) He sold her to Robert Crawford in 1989, and in  December 1997 she passed to Derek Aspey. She was sold again in 2009 but am u8nsure of her current owner.
 
Regards
RAF MARINE CRAFT HISTORIAN


-------------
FAIR WINDS AND A FAVOURABLE TIDE
Donald


Posted By: barnacle
Date Posted: 02 March 2010 at 8:43pm
my discerning eye spots a change of mast, a lengthened superstructure and, I guess the H&S Police have been at work... guard rails!!!

Ill bet theyve got rid of the Taylors parafin stove in the galley as well Big%20smile


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 05 March 2010 at 1:23pm
Originally posted by rafwebfoot rafwebfoot wrote:

just p[icked up on this.  2770 was bought by Capt. Donald MacFarlane 1985/86 and he renamed her CANADIAN OSPREY as he had joint nationality (British and Canadian) He sold her to Robert Crawford in 1989, and in  December 1997 she passed to Derek Aspey. She was sold again in 2009 but am u8nsure of her current owner.
 
Regards
RAF MARINE CRAFT HISTORIAN
 
Unfortunately wrong. I am the person with dual nationality and my name is certainly not D. McFarlane. Also, my name is not Robert Crawford either thank you. She was sold to Derek Aspey in 97, that part is accurate.


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 05 March 2010 at 1:44pm
Originally posted by barnacle barnacle wrote:

my discerning eye spots a change of mast, a lengthened superstructure and, I guess the H&S Police have been at work... guard rails!!!

Ill bet theyve got rid of the Taylors parafin stove in the galley as well Big%20smile
 
 
Your eye does not deceive you. The mast alteration, safety rails and removal of the pressurized paraffin stove was a requirement for her new duties.
 
However, the smiths heating system was retained. We ran that on Jet "A". It  burned hotter than hell that fuel but was readily available to us at the time.
 
The extended wheelhouse was for diver comfort, it contained tables and seating capacity.


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 05 March 2010 at 2:11pm
Originally posted by rafwebfoot rafwebfoot wrote:

just p[icked up on this.  2770 was bought by Capt. Donald MacFarlane 1985/86 and he renamed her CANADIAN OSPREY as he had joint nationality (British and Canadian) He sold her to Robert Crawford in 1989, and in  December 1997 she passed to Derek Aspey. She was sold again in 2009 but am u8nsure of her current owner.
 
Regards
RAF MARINE CRAFT HISTORIAN
 
 
P.S In  considering that it was my family's Canadian Corporation who purchased and paid for the re-fitting of ex- 2770.. Canadian Osprey. I would thank you for no lectures whatsoever regarding her ownership and activities during the period she was in our charge.
 
It is however understandable, as I have previously said, local "Worthy's" fill in information to enhance their very limited knowledge. The facts are as I have stated.


Posted By: muffdiver
Date Posted: 19 March 2010 at 4:31pm
yes the smiths heating system doe's still work and still as hot as hell and the vessel is still afloat but looking very sorry for herself as she has been laid up for a number of years, i agree with you 2770, there is too much speculation on this site, however if you require some recent pics of your old tender please e mail me.
 
cheers


-------------
Best Regards Charlie


Posted By: rafwebfoot
Date Posted: 01 April 2010 at 8:57pm
regarding my mis-informed history of 2770, I can only apologise for my mistakes.  This was put together some years ago and what is even worse is that I actually received an e-mail from 2770 himself back in the early 2000s but for some reason did not update my records.  THIS HAS NOW BEEN DONE.  I remember the boat very well as both she and 2757 were at Portrush with me.  The Navy wanted a fast dispatch boat for the Clyde and  thankfully they were persuaded to take 2770. (they originally wanted 2757 but as she was the better boat we did not want to lose her).    Imagine my surprise when many years after leaving Portrush I spotted a Naval RTTL in the Great Dock at Greenock.  She could only have been 2770 and when I saw her name board - OSPREY, this confirmed it.  I have done my best to keep tabs on her since then (along with most surviving RAF craft).  I would welcome some update  pics especially of her interior Muffdiver and in return I would send you what I have on her RAF history.  I did this for her previous owner so perhaps it was passed on with the boat (along with AP.4225B her manual)  2770 was the penultimate 68ft RTTL built for the RAF and is now one of the only seven remaining.  Her sister 2771 was last seen  laid up in Malta a few years back after serving with the Maltese Coastguard as C.71.  These were the only two RTTLs built by Saunders & Roe.

-------------
FAIR WINDS AND A FAVOURABLE TIDE
Donald


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 08 April 2010 at 4:47pm
Canadian Osprey (ex-2770) At refitting.
 
 
http://img339.imageshack.us/i/2770.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 08 April 2010 at 9:26pm
 
New weather deck.
 
http://img87.imageshack.us/i/scan0001iy.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 08 April 2010 at 10:11pm
Starting the teardown.
 
http://img219.imageshack.us/i/scan0002a.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 08 April 2010 at 10:43pm
Original engine room cleared of all mechanical and electrical kit in preparation to convert it for accommodation.
 
http://img514.imageshack.us/i/scan0003gj.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 08 April 2010 at 11:11pm
Engine room to fuel tank space bulkhead. V Drives removed and our design flood-proof through boxes in place and coupled up to the original shafts.
 
http://img405.imageshack.us/i/scan0005a.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 08 April 2010 at 11:42pm
Original avgas tank space converted to new engine room.. Tanks, fuel systems and Halon fire extinguishing system removed. Twin Bed/GM's and Perkins generator in place.
 
When removing the fire extinguishing system the bloody thing went off, filling all the below deck space with Halon gas. It took two days before it dispersed to a safe level. One upside advantage, it killed every bug on board.
 
http://img718.imageshack.us/i/scan0006j.jpg/">


Posted By: muffdiver
Date Posted: 09 April 2010 at 1:03am
many thanks for recent posting of pictures during Osprey's refit,yes the GM Bedford 477 main engines and Perkins genny are still there and found the halon tank mountings,in the bilges and the fuel tanks are some size.
is it true ? that the old girl sailed from home port through the Med to the Aegean sea, to the Gulf of Oman, around the South African coast to the Azores across the the US of A,up to Canada and back to home port Glasgow, if she did i wish i had of been on that trip. by hell the hour meters must have been around the clock twice over. but the heater is still hot as hell !!!!
i will sort out some recent pictures try and shrink them and forward them on somehow either direct or through rafwebfoot.

cheers
muff diver

-------------
Best Regards Charlie


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 09 April 2010 at 9:27am
Hi there muffdiver ( thats a great handle you have lol ).
 
Any government Baltic Exchange contract denies you the ability to discuss its requirements. However, I can say that Canadian Osprey went the distance, as they say, when in our charge.
 
Northern waters, as always, proving the most challenging.
 
Her home port as registered was Norfolk, Virginia, United States.  
 
In fact, because of an oversight on our part, we did not remove her from the register until 2005. So technically she was still an American small ship (under 100 tons) when in Mr Aspey's ownership.
 
The Boat Owners Association of the United States, Boat/US, knows of her under my membership.  


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 09 April 2010 at 10:21am
New down-sized propellers. These proved useless and had to be changed as they gave an over-the-ground speed of 6 knots! The size was calculated by the manufacturer using a computer generated model. We in turn resorted to the old paper style calculation producing a propeller similar to the 60 ft GSP 2-1 reduction  23-1/2 x 23 prop. Our's were 24 x 24. The smaller props were retained as emergency spares.
 
The rudders were our own design with paddle fins for slow,tight maneuvering. Capable of being dropped off  to remove the props without slipping, this proved useful as we had to change the props.
 
New copper sheathing on the double diagonal as a protection against marine borers, toredo worm and zebra muscles. The triple skin was painted with SSBN (US Navy) anti-foul which kills absolutely everything trying to adhere to it. Dangerous stuff for sure. 
http://img59.imageshack.us/i/scan0007xe.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 09 April 2010 at 11:11am
[QUOTE=muffdiver]
 by hell the hour meters must have been around the clock twice over.
..........................................................................................................................................
 
Hi again Muffdiver. ( I have to laugh when I write your handle ).
 
On the machinery hour counters. We did not fit those,we did have some static bolt-on counters which worked by measuring vibration but they were never fitted. Only the harbor generator had one when we had Canadian Osprey, and that proved to be unreliable.
 
It is always better to work on recorded log times for maintenance than rely on vibro-counters.. By their very nature they tend to vibrate to destruction prematurely.
 
...........................................................................................................................................
 
Another point needing to be cleared up. I never re-named ex-2770 as Canadian Osprey, my late mother did.


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 09 April 2010 at 12:09pm
Below, forward section at time of purchase.
 
http://img149.imageshack.us/i/scan0009y.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 09 April 2010 at 12:16pm
Re-fit completed. Time taken - 11 months from purchase to launch. Cost to us at the time, minus purchase price, $49000.00 CAD.or thereby.
 
http://img638.imageshack.us/i/scan0010k.jpg/">
 
That's the last of the surviving photographs which I can find, if I find more I will post them. Somewhere there is a video diary covering most of her refit, ensuing boat work and re-enlistment venues for the USN. If I find it I will have it converted to DVD and post it online.
 
I do hope my info has been useful. Perhaps even filling a hazy chapter in the history of ex-2770 (Canadian Osprey)


Posted By: muffdiver
Date Posted: 11 April 2010 at 2:11am
D2770 many thanks again for the recent pictures, they are priceless for the history of the vessel i quite agree the old traditional navy log was the best way to log the main engines,on the hour every hour and better than any mechanical meter reading, i am having difficulty reducing my HQ pics below 50 mb to upload to this web site, do you want me to e mail them PM,if so please let me know.
ps my handle is not as bad as you think !!!!
i have two versions of the above and are good at both !!!!
regards
Muff diver


-------------
Best Regards Charlie


Posted By: rafwebfoot
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 8:11am
many thanks 2770 for the recunstruction pics and details.  How did she perform with the smaller props?  When in service she would have been fitted with 33" x 37.5" L/H props. which must have been a wee bit excessive for civilian use and unsuitable for anything other than the RR Sea Griffons.

-------------
FAIR WINDS AND A FAVOURABLE TIDE
Donald


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 11:30am
The props at 24x24 proved just fine.Giving an average of 12 - 15 knots O.T.G from memory. The sailing,machinery and diving compressor logs were all up to date when we parted company with her and should have been in the navigation case we passed on to the new owner, including machinery / electrical kit info manuals.. Consultation of the sailing logs will give the exact revs and speed achieved.... Please remember, we are well over 20 years on from her refit by us and I have done a mighty lot of sea miles since. 
 
Needless to say the props were handed.Those props were "Cut-Downs". The original size could still be on the boss as I cannot remember if they were re-stamped with the new size by the supplier. Had the originals been 24-25 pitch and handed we would have machined those down instead of replacing. However,although it can be done with difficulty, a pitch change was not an option.
 She could go harder at it depending on wind, tide and engine revolutions. However, I have never been one for caning main engines needlessly.1500 - 1800 RPM being just dandy. Without teaching others how to suck eggs,If you work the wind and tide to your advantage then the revs can be dropped considerably.
 
I have a personal strong dislike of twin or triple mono-directional props on hard chine planing / semi planing hulls, having been "Adhered" to the harbor walls and unable to paddle wheel off in gale force winds a few times. They were also quite useless on 2770 for our chosen work. Something which really surprised me, we offered Hendon all of the discarded fittings, machinery and electrical kit. Including the original RT. They declined the offer. 


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 12:34pm
Of any interest?
 
http://img408.imageshack.us/i/005su.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 12:36pm
http://img260.imageshack.us/i/009ob.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 12:39pm
http://img59.imageshack.us/i/010vq.jpg/">


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 12:57pm
Originally posted by muffdiver muffdiver wrote:

D2770 many thanks again for the recent pictures, they are priceless for the history of the vessel i quite agree the old traditional navy log was the best way to log the main engines,on the hour every hour and better than any mechanical meter reading, i am having difficulty reducing my HQ pics below 50 mb to upload to this web site, do you want me to e mail them PM,if so please let me know.
ps my handle is not as bad as you think !!!!
i have two versions of the above and are good at both !!!!
regards
Muff diver
Sure, PM the photographs to me. I am interested to see what of our design changes have survived the test of time and new owner requirement.
 
Many thanks.


Posted By: 2770
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 3:50pm
Addendum.
 
If anyone wonders how we actually found ex-2770.
 
...We were looking for a vessel of between 70 - 100 ft for conversion, and capable of enduring long sea passages if required. We had been over in Europe inspecting quite a few, some commercial and some pleasure craft, of which two seemed suitable for purpose both by price and being reasonably sea worthy. On return we stopped over in London, staying at the Union Jack club. An old Marine buddy of mine was also staying there and on hearing we were on the hunt showed us an advertisement, just a few simple lines without a photograph of a boat for sale.

 
We decided to have a look at her. She was in an absolutely atrocious state, dried out with hull seams agape, covered in guano, grime and earmarked for burning if she did not sell quickly. We liked her from first sight although she was slightly smaller than our target size and built of wood rather than steel, our preferred hull material. We gave the seller his demanded deposit on the spot. I guess he had decided that having such crazy fools on the hook by buying into such a dilapidated boat required a deposit, just in case we changed our minds. How little he knew of us,nor our intentions.
 
Anyway, how could we possibly pass on her as my father had been Wartime marine craft for a time after being wounded in North Africa. He returned to flying squadrons being declared "now fit for flying". However,he never forgot his fine time in the ASR's. He remained a member of both the Air Force Association (overseas branch) and A.S.R /M.C.S club until his passing.
 
Well, that is how we found ex-2770.  Or alternatively in some strange way did she possibly find us?...If you believe in fate that is. 


Posted By: rafwebfoot
Date Posted: 15 April 2010 at 7:49pm
Hello again 2770.  It does not surprise me that Hendon refused your offer.  One should bear in  mind that they are the RAF museum and if it doesn't fly then they are not interested.  It took a great deal of hard work for the lads of the ASR & MCS club to have the two boats on display, and had it not been for the persuasive efforts of Ken Hunter (based at Stafford and now retired) they would not be there.  The Marine Branch thankfully was never accepted as part of the RAF proper and we often found that when being annually inspected by the various AOC's that they took us with a pinch of salt and were often overheard saying to their aids " you know I never new that the Raf had boats", " what splendid chaps".  I fully concur with your feelings on leaving a quayside when being blown onto it by a gale of wind.  The RTTLs were very windborne but at least we had the power of the two Sea Griffons to help.  The downside to them was that with both engines at idle,  the boat would creep forward at around 5 knots which made for some interesting boat handling at times. 

-------------
FAIR WINDS AND A FAVOURABLE TIDE
Donald


Posted By: barnacle
Date Posted: 24 April 2010 at 11:08am
2770's comments re the removal of the fire extiguishing system bought a flashback of memories.

Sat below one morning on 2757 enjoying the 1st brew of the day and one of the deckies appears with a gloomy look on his face.. "Ive just been told they want the Co2 bottles taking out.... and theyve asked if we'll do it as the engineers are replacing an exhaust bend... "

Now this was a job id never had to do before.. I knew where the bottles were of course but it had never occured to me how do you get them out!!

I soon found out !!!

After removing the contents of the locker under the companionway, and finding kit we didnt know we had onboard we proceeded to remove the companionway itself to reveal, securely fastened down, two, or was it 3, huge great rusty metal gas bottles.

Locked off to prevent them firing we got them out of their beds but then had the difficult job of getting them topside (we slid them up a plank seeing as the companionway had been removed.. )

Our comments to the engine room inhabitants need not be recorded as they sat on the engineroom top offering unhelpful advice.

On another note... did anyone ever try to remove a freshwater tank from an RTTL?


Posted By: rafwebfoot
Date Posted: 24 April 2010 at 11:07pm
no but I did assist with removing the three tank system on 2772 and replacing it with the five tank set up - very interesting!!!!

-------------
FAIR WINDS AND A FAVOURABLE TIDE
Donald


Posted By: barnacle
Date Posted: 25 April 2010 at 2:36am
Procedure for removing RTTL Freshwater tank :-

Empty crockery and cutlery stowage above fo'c'sle table (avoid breaking plates)

Remove fo'c'sle table complete

Remove galley front bulkhead

Ask why the fitters or the chippies arent helping with this....

Lift deckboards (very easy, none were secured anyway)

Unfasten all fittings from the water tank (corroded)

Remove tank holding down brackets (very corroded)

Ask why the fitters or the chippies arent helping with this....

Spend the best part of an hour struggling to move the tank

Ask why the fitters or the chippies arent helping with this....Angry

Get heaving line.

Tie heaving line around tank and lead line out through the forward watertight door, up through the fo'rr'ad hatch, through the bullring and onto the anchor winch.

Heave away on the winch till the tank finally is withdrawn from its seating (hoping that it moves before the heaving line gives way under the strain Confused )

Manhandle tank through the sickbay, up the companionway and deposit on the dockside.

Reinstall all fo'c'sle fittings. (make note to repaint all destroyed paintwork)

Ask why the fitters or the chippies arent helping with this....








Posted By: rafwebfoot
Date Posted: 26 April 2010 at 8:17pm
Fitters and chippies (wood butchers) were always conspicuous by their absence at times like those, and during Winter, the Fitters would lock themselves in their cosy enginerooms and the Chippies would not move from their wood burning stoves. Boy did they hate slipping in Winter.

-------------
FAIR WINDS AND A FAVOURABLE TIDE
Donald


Posted By: barnacle
Date Posted: 13 November 2011 at 12:59am



Posted By: Piquat
Date Posted: 10 September 2018 at 7:59am
When searching for something else online I tagged this:-


More information:

This image could have imperfections as itís either historical or reportage.
Apr. 04, 1961 - Model of R.A.F. Search And Rescue Launch For Royal Tournament Tours Hendon Area. The one-third scale model (length 26 1/2 ft. beam 8ft. 9ins), of a high-speed R.A.F. search and rescue launch, built by airmen in a hangar at Hendon for use in the display, ''Search and Survival in the R.A.F.' at this year's Royal Tournament, today made its ''shake-down cruise'' when it toured the Hendon area. Keystone Photo Shows:- The model R.A.F. search and rescue launch, pulls up beside a London bus - and ''coxswain'' Sgt. Fred Holt, chats to bus-driver, Percy Rawlings, at Alperton. (Credit Image: Keystone Pictures USA/ZUMAPRESS)

Photographer: KEYSTONE Pictures USA

Date taken: 4 April 1961



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