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Plunging into paint

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FlyByWire View Drop Down
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    Posted: 28 May 2007 at 9:39am

Hello again,

  I was going to tack this onto my last post, but decided it deserved a posting of its own;

  I'm going to actually start painting my boat at some point this year...the weather's almost consistently good enough to strip the last of the old paint off...but I've got a few questions before I go diving in;

  I've been told that aluminium, or pink wood-primer is the stuff to use first, as it'll soak into the wood and preserve it; is that a good idea?

  The planking has seperated by five or six millimetres having been out of the water for so long now;  should I put something in the gaps or leave them on the basis that they'll close up again once back in the water?

  There are a few planks that have split through damage over the decades;  were I to replace them, is it as "simple" a job as drilling out the rivets, fitting a new plank and then re-rivetting it?  What wood should I use?  Mahogany (which is what my boat's made of) is rather impractical to obtain these days...

  Any help will be much appreciated,

   All the best,

Paul

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dgray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2007 at 10:05am

Hi Paul,
With regard to the planking I use Sapele  which is an African type of mahogany. It is nice to work with and planes beautifully. 

The bottomsides are roved on my boat but the topsides are screwed.
Roving is not a bad job but you need patience and probably a second person to help as you need to put pressure on the copper nail head while the other taps on the copper rivet and cuts and rounds the nail head.

I bought a set of roving tools from www.tradboats.com but it is an expensive way to go to replace a few planks.

If you get a bit of hollow steel pipe (that the nail can fit into) and use a ball peen hammer on the outside, it can work well, especislly if you both hit the nail at the same time.  The rove should be hit well onto the wood (indent the wood a little) and the nail head must be well hammered into the timber so that the joint is tight (obvioisly you'll  drill a pilot hole prior to hammering the nails.    Cut the nail about 2mm above the rove head and, using the round end of a ball been hammer, gently round the nail shaft over the rove.  Make sure the person on the outside keeps the nail well in to the timber before cutting & rounding the nail.

I'm no expert ( believe you me) but a  morning's work should rove in 3 or more planks.   I suggest that you practice on a few bits of old wood first as it's a bit ok a knack working with 2 people.

Hope this helps.



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Don


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FlyByWire Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2007 at 10:13am

Thanks Don,

  do you put anything on the canvas between the planks before you put the new plank in place?

  I've read before about using nuts and bolts instead of roving - does that sound likely?

Paul

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dgray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2007 at 10:43am
Hi Paul,

When the boats were new they put doped canvas between the layers of DD planking.  Not practical when repairing a few planks.

Personally, I would use a bead of Sikaflex ( 291 I think) around the bottom edge of the plank and screw the plank on as normal.   If you use holding screws then drill and rove when it, it should be fine. 

I tend to leave a small gap (2p thickness)  when fitting planks on my little boat. White lead paste will fill the gaps before painting.

I have taken the covers of my boat so she is getting a good soaking before I try painting.  Maybe put the sprinkler on her or spray with salt water. It all helps to close the gaps!

I wouldn't use stainless bolts for a few reasons:-

1) The head will need to be let into the planking.
2). Bolts will look horrible on inside and mahe the repair look like a bodge.
3). The copper nail/rove when hammered fit flush with the timber and load evenly. A steel washer/nut won't bend and may put a loading on one side of the washer and may turn into a a weaker joint.
4) Cost.  Steel will be very expensive.
5). Learn a traditional skill. It's half the fun of it. Once you've put in your first 100 it's a doddle.  Seriously, put in 3 or 4 in a bit of scrap wood and you're good to go.  Drill the pilot hole, hammer in the nail. Bang on the rivet, check all is tight, cut and round the nail head. Only 2-3 minutes a nail.

When you see it done properly after you've roved it, you'll appreciate the effort.

Don


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote FlyByWire Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2007 at 11:33am

I'm all up for learning traditional skills :)

Doesn't the white lead paste get squeezed out when the planks expand in the water?

Paul

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dgray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2007 at 11:56am
Hi Paul,

Well yes,  if the timber is bone dry before going in the water. That was why I suggested soaking the open timbers a few times over a few days to try to get the water content level higher. In this miserable weather,  timber should get nice & wet!

Once filled and painted water 'should' not get out - well that's the
theory.

Anyone else have any solutions to this age old problem?

Don


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rafwebfoot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2007 at 12:41pm

Hi folks,

the material used between the skins of D/D planking was ioled calico (calico soaked in linseed oil)

 

Regards,

Donald

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote clive Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2007 at 6:40pm
I use wet blankets inside for a couple of weeks to swell the planks on my launch, she is varnished mahogany, it is definitely worth doing before painting as the paint ends up with lines if you dont. It may be worth hanging wet blankets over the sides too as she is d/d and sounds very dry..
masbie something in the water.   www.freewebs.com/masb32/
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